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Body Lore and Laws

Essays on Law and the Human Body

Editor(s): Andrew Bainham, Shelley Day Sclater, Martin Richards
Media of Body Lore and Laws
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Published: 18-01-2002
Format: PDF eBook (?)
Edition: 1st
Extent: 400
ISBN: 9781847312631
Imprint: Hart Publishing
RRP: £41.02
Online price : £36.92
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Loren Epson

About Body Lore and Laws

This book,the second produced by the Cambridge Socio-Legal Group, is a collection of essays on the subject of law and the human body. As the title suggests, bodies and body parts are not only subject to regulation through formal legal processes, but also the meanings attached to particular bodies, and the significance accorded to some body parts, are aspects of
broader cultural processes. In short, bodies are subjected to both lore and laws. The contributors, all leading academics in the fields of Law, Sociology, Psychology, Feminism, Criminology, Biology and Genetics, respectively, offer a range of interdisciplinary papers that critically examine how bodies are constructed and regulated in law.

The book is divided into two parts. Part one is concerned with 'Making Bodies' and includes papers relating to transactions in human gametes, cloning, court-ordered caesarean sections, testing for genetic risk, the patenting of human genes and the social policy implications of the growth in genetic information. Part two is concerned with 'Using and Abusing Bodies'. It contains chapters relating to sexualities, sexual orientation and the law, sex workers and their clients, domestic homicide, religious and cultural practices and other issues involving children's bodies, the ownership of the body and body parts and the legal and ethical issues surrounding euthanasia.

Table Of Contents

1. Introduction
SHELLEY DAY SCLATER

2. Bodies as Property: from Slavery to DNA Maps
EILEEN RICHARDSON AND BRYAN S. TURNER

3. Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies
JONATHAN HERRING

4. Discovering and Patenting Human Genes
GREGORY RADICK

5. Letting Go . . . Parents, Professionals and the Law in Retention of Human Material after Post Mortem
MAVIS MACLEAN

6. Male Medical Students and the Male Body
MARTIN H. JOHNSON

7. Domestic Homicide, Gender and the Expert
FELICITY KAGANAS

8. The Many Appearances of the Body in Feminist Scholarship
ANNE BOTTOMLEY

9. Male Bodies, Family Practices
RICHARD COLLIER

10. Sexualities, Sexual Relations and the Law
ANDREW BAINHAM

11. Hiring Bodies: Male Clients and Prostitution
BELINDA BROOKS-GORDON AND LORAINE GELSTHORPE

12. Villain, Hero or Masked Stranger: Ambivalence in Transactions with Human Gametes
RACHEL COOK

13. Court-Ordered Caesarean Sections
JANE WEAVER

14. Dehydrating Bodies: the Bland case, The Winterton Bill and the Importance of Intention in Evaluating End-of-Life Decision-Making
JOHN KEOWN

15. Religion, Culture and the Body of the Child
CAROLINE BRIDGE

16. Future Bodies: Some History and Future Prospects for Human Genetic Selection
MARTIN RICHARDS

17. Perceptions of the Body and Genetic Risk
ELIZABETH CHAPMAN

18. Science, Medicine and Ethical Change
DEREK MORGAN

Reviews

“A great strength of the work is the diversity of topics covered.
A reader approaching this book may want to focus on a particular topic or set of topics, but, if one takes the time to read all of the essays, s/he will, I believe, come away with a renewed appreciation of the diversity and complexity of issues at stake in this arena of legal discourse.
” –  Thomas C. Shevory, Ithaca College, The Law and Politics Book Review

“…a fascinating variety of perspectives and issues are included.
The 18 chapters constitute a useful volume for academics and (undergraduate and postgraduate) students 'working on the body' in a range of disciplines.
” –  Lois Bibbings, University of Bristol, Child and Family Law Quarterly

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