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Criminal Justice in Transition

The Northern Ireland Context

Editor(s): Anne-Marie McAlinden, Clare Dwyer
Media of Criminal Justice in Transition
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Published: 28-12-2017
Format: Paperback
Edition: 1st
Extent: 416
ISBN: 9781509918331
Imprint: Hart Publishing
RRP: £29.99

: 14 -21 days

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Loren Epson

About Criminal Justice in Transition

This book represents a critical examination of key aspects of crime and criminal justice in Northern Ireland which will have resonance elsewhere. It considers the core aspects of criminal justice policy-making in Northern Ireland which are central to the process of post-conflict transition, including reform of policing, judicial decision-making and correctional services such as probation and prisons. It examines contemporary trends in criminal justice in Northern Ireland and various dimensions of crime relating to female offenders, young offenders, sexual and violent offenders, community safety and restorative justice. The book also considers the extent to which crime and criminal justice issues in Northern Ireland are being affected by the broader processes of 'policy transfer', globalisation and transnationalism and the extent to which criminal justice in Northern Ireland is divergent from the other jurisdictions in the United Kingdom. Written by leading international authorities in the field, the book offers a snapshot of the cutting edge of critical thinking in criminal justice practice and transitional justice contexts.

Table Of Contents

Part I: Conceptualising Crime and Criminal Justice in Northern Ireland
1. Crime and Criminal Justice in Northern Ireland: Conflict, Transition and the Legacy of the Past
Clare Dwyer and Anne-Marie McAlinden
2. Criminal Justice, Truth Recovery and Dealing with the Past in Northern Ireland
Cheryl Lawther
3. Bringing Humanity Home: A Transformational Human Rights Culture for Northern Ireland?
Colin Harvey
4. Criminal Justice Reform in Northern Ireland: The Agents of Change
Brice Dickson
5. Governing Justice Through Risk: The Development of Penal and Social Policies in a Transitional Context
Clare Dwyer
Part II: The Criminal Justice Process
6. Policing in Transition
John Topping
7. Finding 'Merit' in Judicial Appointments: The Northern Ireland Judicial Appointments Commission (NIJAC) and the Search for a New Judiciary for Northern Ireland
John Morison
8. Judging and Conflict: Audience, Performance and the Judicial Past
Kieran McEvoy and Alex Schwartz
9. Prisons and Imprisonment in Northern Ireland
Phil Scraton
10. Prisoner Reintegration in a Transitional Society: The Northern Ireland Experience
Clare Dwyer
11. Probation and Community Sanctions in Northern Ireland: Historical and Contemporary Contexts
Nicola Carr
12. Revisiting the Past: Miscarriages of Justice, the Courts and Transition
Marny Requa
Part III: Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice
13. Transition, Women and Criminal Justice in Northern Ireland
Linda Moore and Azrini Wahidin
14. Young People, Crime and Justice in Northern Ireland
Deena Haydon and Siobhán McAlister
15. Public and Official Responses to Sexual and Violent Crime in Northern Ireland
Anne-Marie McAlinden
16. Restorative Justice in the Northern Ireland Transition
Anna Eriksson
Part IV: Overview and Prospects
17. 'Doing' Criminal Justice in Northern Ireland: 'Policy Transfer', Transitional Justice and Governing Through the Past
Anne-Marie McAlinden and Clare Dwyer


“ excellent opportunity for the reader to access a stimulating collection of work written by experienced researchers within the context of transitional justice...It is quite simply an outstanding achievement.” –  Declan Crawley, Irish Probation Law Journal

“... this is a very impressive collection - wide-ranging, informative, topical and insightful. It will certainly appeal to anyone interested in criminal justice in Northern Ireland but the issues it raises have a resonance far beyond there, and so it will also appeal to academics, researchers, policy-makers and others interested in transitional contexts and in the dynamics of institutional reform more generally.” –  Aogán Mulcahy, University College Dublin, The British Journal of Criminology

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