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Executive-legislative (Im)balance in the European Union

Editor(s): Diane Fromage, Anna Herranz-Surrallés
Media of Executive-legislative (Im)balance in the European Union
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Published: 11-02-2021
Format: PDF eBook (?)
Edition: 1st
Extent: 360
ISBN: 9781509930029
Imprint: Hart Publishing
Series: Parliamentary Democracy in Europe
RRP: £85.50
Online price : £68.40
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Loren Epson

About Executive-legislative (Im)balance in the European Union

Ten years after the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty, has executive predominance in EU-related matters disappeared? How have executive-legislative relations in the EU evolved over a crisis-ridden decade, from the financial and migration crises, to Brexit and the COVID-19 pandemic?

The Lisbon Treaty could be expected to lead to the re-balancing of powers in favour of parliaments, for it significantly enhanced the roles of both the European Parliament and national parliaments. A decade later the contributions to this edited volume examine – for the first time in such an extensive breadth and from a multi-level and cross-policy perspective – whether this has actually materialised. They highlight that diverging tendencies may be observed, and that important variations over time have occurred, depending particularly on the occurrence of crises. As stated in the fascinating epilogue by Peter Lindseth (University of Connecticut School of Law), this is an 'admirably coherent collective volume, whose contributions provide an excellent overview of key aspects of executive-legislative relations in the European system since the Treaty of Lisbon'. This edited volume will hence be of interest to both academics and practitioners interested in future reforms designed at the European and national levels to improve the EU's democratic quality.

Table Of Contents

Introduction: Executive–Legislative (Im)balance in the European Union
Diane Fromage, Maastricht University, The Netherlands, and Anna Herranz-Surralles Maastricht University, The Netherlands
PART I
EXECUTIVE–LEGISLATIVE RELATIONS FROM A MULTI-LEVEL PERSPECTIVE
1. Recalibration of Executive–Legislative Relations in the European Union: Strategies Inspired by the Trilemma of Democracy, Sovereignty and Integration
Peter Bursens, University of Antwerp, Belgium
2. The Anticipation Function of Interinstitutional Agreements: A Smooth Mechanism to Recalibrate Executive–Legislative Relations
Marco Urban, University of Lausanne, Switzerland
3. Divided Accountability of the Council and the European Council: The Challenge of Collective Parliamentary Oversight
Elena Griglio, LUISS Guido Carli University, Italy
4. Executive–Legislative Relations and Delegated Powers in the European Union: Continuous Recalibration?
Thomas Christiansen, LUISS Guido Carli University, Italy, and Sabina Lange, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

PART II
EXECUTIVE–LEGISLATIVE (IM)BALANCE WITHIN MEMBER STATES
5. The Implementation of EU Law in Member States and its Impact on the Relationship between Parliaments and Governments
Diane Fromage, Maastricht University, The Netherlands
6. National Strategies of EU Law Transposition: Does the Distinction between Legislative and Executive Measures Matter in Practice?
Robert Zbiral, Masaryk University, Czech Republic, and Jan Grinc, Charles University, Czech Republic
7. Failed Constitutional Reforms and Silent Constitutional Transformations in Executive–Legislative Relations: The Case of Italy
Nicola Lupo, LUISS Guido Carli University, Italy
8. Short-Lived Reparliamentarisation? A Year of Eff orts to 'Take Back Control' from the Executive in the Brexit House of Commons
Kathryn Wright, University of York, UK

PART III
EXECUTIVE–LEGISLATIVE (IM)BALANCE AND VARIATIONS ACROSS POLICY AREAS
9. How the Debates on Trade Policy Helped Rebalance the Executive–Legislative Relationship in Favour of the European Parliament
Peter Marton, New Zealand Mission to the EU in Brussels, Belgium
10. A Temporary Recalibration of Executive–Legislative Relations on EU Trade Agreements? The Case of National and Regional Parliaments on CETA and TTIP
Cristina Fasone, LUISS Guido Carli University, Italy, and Maria Romaniello, IMT School for Advanced Studies Lucca, Italy
11. Exploring Interaction between National Parliaments and the European Parliament in EU Trade Policy
Katharina L Meissner, University of Vienna, Austria, and Guri Rosen, Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway
12. The European Parliament's Role in the Operation of Trade Agreements: Parliamentary Control and Executive – Legislative Balance in External Action
Wolfgang Weiß, German University of Administrative Sciences Speyer, Germany
13. Representative Democracy in Financial Crisis Governance: New Challenges in the EU Multi-level System
Claudia Wiesner, Fulda University of Applied Sciences, Germany
14. Towards the ' Normalisation ' of Security? Executive– Legislative Relations in an Expanding EU Security and Defence Policy
Anna Herranz-Surralles, Maastricht University, The Netherlands
15. The Balance of Powers and the EU's Common Foreign and Security Policy
Graham Butler, Aarhus University, Denmark
16. All Buzz, No Bite: The Parliamentarisation of the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice
Angela Tacea, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium
17. Epilogue: Executives, Legislatures and the Semantics of EU Public Law: A Pandemic-Inflected Perspective
Peter L Lindseth, University of Connecticut, USA

Reviews

“It is the great strength of this edited volume that it offers such invaluable input – based on excellent empirical work – for addressing … normative and conceptual questions and for putting them in the right light. I am therefore certain it will find its way in the broad field of EU Legal Studies and Governance. But I hope the book will do more than that. I hope it will equally benefit the work of the Conference on the Future of the EU.” –  Ton van den Brink, University of Utrecht, EU Law Live

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