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Informed Publics, Media and International Law

By: Daniel Joyce
Media of Informed Publics, Media and International Law
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Published: 26-11-2020
Format: Hardback
Edition: 1st
Extent: 200
ISBN: 9781509930418
Imprint: Hart Publishing
Dimensions: 234 x 156 mm
RRP: £60.00
Online price : £42.00
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Loren Epson

About Informed Publics, Media and International Law

This book considers the significance of informed publics from the perspective of international law. It does so by analysing international media law frameworks and the 'mediatization' of international law in institutional settings. This approach exposes the complexity of the interrelationship between international law and the media, but also points to the dangers involved in international law's associated and increasing reliance upon the mediated techniques of communicative capitalism – such as publicity – premised upon an informed international public whose existence many now question.

The book explores the ways in which traditional regulatory and analytical categories are increasingly challenged - revealed as inadequate or bypassed - but also assesses their resilience and future utility in light of significant technological change and concerns about fake news, the rise of big data and algorithmic accountability. Furthermore, it contends that analysing the imbrication of media and international law in the current digital transition is necessary to understand the nature of the problems a system such as international law faces without sufficiently informed publics.

The book argues that international law depends on informed global publics to function and to address the complex global problems which we face. This draws into view the role media plays in relation to international law, but also the role of international law in regulating the media, and reveals the communicative character of international law.

Table Of Contents

Introduction
I. Media and Mediatization
II. The Imbrication of Media and International Law
III. Structure
1. Informed Publics
I. Informed Publics
II. Public Opinion and International Law
III. Cold War Debates Over Information and Media
IV. Contemporary Challenges
V. Summary
2. Free Publics
I. Freedom of Expression
II. Limits to Media Freedom
III. Licensing
IV. Defamation and Insult Laws
V. Contempt and the Protection of Sources
VI. National Security
VII. Privacy
VIII. Media Pluralism
IX. International Trade Law
X. Summary
3. Endangered Publics
I. Incitement, Hate Speech and Propaganda
II. International Criminal Law
III. International Humanitarian Law
IV. Information Intervention, Cybersecurity and Computational Propaganda
V. Summary
4. Digital Publics
I. Telecommunications
II. Internet Governance
III. A Human Rights Approach
IV. Data Governance
V. Platform Governance
VI. Summary
5. Publicity
I. Institutional Publicity
II. International Criminal Law
III. Human Rights and Witnessing
IV. Summary 7
6. The Critique of Publicity
I. Mediatization and Conflict
II. Visibility and Invisibility
III. Communicative Capitalism and Humanitarianism
IV. International Law, Media and Engaging Informed Publics
V. Summary
Conclusion

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