Your Basket is currently empty

Your Bookshelf is empty!

Your Basket is currently empty


Banner

International Trade and Economic Law and the European Union

By: Sara Dillon
Media of International Trade and Economic Law and the European Union
See larger image
Published: 09-09-2002
Format: Paperback
Edition: 1st
Extent: 400
ISBN: 9781841131139
Imprint: Hart Publishing
Dimensions: 234 x 156 mm
RRP: £54.99
Online price : £49.49
Save £5.50 (10%)
 

: UK Delivery 5-7 working days

Request Inspection Copy   (?)
Once you have successfully made your inspection-copy request, you will receive a confirmation email explaining that your request is awaiting approval. On approval, you will either be sent the print copy of the book, or you will receive a further email containing the link to allow you to download your eBook.

This book is also available in other formats: View formats

Delivery & Returns

Tell others about this product

Loren Epson

About International Trade and Economic Law and the European Union

This timely book explores the developing nature of international trade law,with particular emphasis on World Trade Organization law and its effects within the European Union. In the aftermath of the Seattle upheaval, vital questions are being raised as to the future course of global economic law; its overall legitimacy, implications for democracy, for national social and environmental policies, and for the well being of the world's people. This highly technical subject is rigorously analysed, yet the main legal developments and the major trade disputes are discussed in an accessible narrative style. The first section covers the common historical roots of the GATT and the EC, systems of integration that were part of an idealistic post-war heritage. The book goes on to demonstrate the idiosyncratic development of GATT law, leading to the launch of the WTO in 1995 and the controversial Uruguay Round Agreements which represented the beginning of an enormous proliferation of causes of action and a greatly enhanced legalism for the global trading system.

Table Of Contents

PART I GLOBAL CONTEXT
1 Introduction: The Problem of Europe in a Globalised World
2 Early GATT

PART II THE EFFECTS OF THE URUGUAY ROUND
3 Intellectual Property Rights and Trade: Creating the TRIPS Agreement
4 “Free Trade in Investments”
5 “Trade and the Environment”: International trade rules and national regulation of the environment
6 The trouble with Trade in Agriculture
7 Safeguards: Escape clauses and the power of self-protection
8 Liberalising the Textile trade: The only Uuruguay Round Agreement of clear benefit to the Developing World
9 The Power of the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS)
10 National measures against dumping and subsidies

PART III EXTERNAL TRADE RELATIONS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION
11 European External Trade Relations: Uniformity Without
12 The European Court of Justice meets GATT Law: The Power of First Impressions

Reviews

“Dillon's presentation is both clear and precise. She provides generous references and detailed discussion of a series of leading cases This is a book which could be recommended to academics, practitioners and students interested not only in GATT/WTO law but also its application within the geographical limits of the EU.” –  Dr Sideek Mohamed, Stockholm University, The Law and Politics Book Review

“…a very valuable contribution to an ongoing debate about the future of Europe's course on the way to global governance very readable accessible to a wider audience. As a textbook and casebook it should certainly be put on the reading list of International Economic Law classes.” –  Christoph Herrmann, Bayreuth, Common Market Law Review

“It presents a useful tool for those seeking a more in-depth understanding of the WTO and its juridical relationship with the EU.

I recommend International Trade and Economic Law and the European Union for academic law libraries, firm libraries, and even collections in public interest organizations that support active research, practice, or advocacy in the areas of international trade, the WTO, or the EU.

” –  Mark D. Engsberg, International Journal of Legal Information

Bookmark and Share
Close