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Kälin and Kochenov’s Quality of Nationality Index

An Objective Ranking of the Nationalities of the World

Editor(s): Dimitry Kochenov, Justin Lindeboom
Media of Kälin and Kochenov’s Quality of Nationality Index
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Published: 14-05-2020
Format: Paperback
Edition: 1st
Extent: 320
ISBN: 9781509933235
Imprint: Hart Publishing
Dimensions: 280 x 210 mm
RRP: £30.00
Online price : £27.00
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Loren Epson

About Kälin and Kochenov’s Quality of Nationality Index

Kälin and Kochenov's Quality of Nationality Index (QNI) ranks the objective value of all nationalities as legal statuses of attachment to states. Using a wide variety of strictly quantifiable data to gauge the opportunities presented and limitations imposed by nationalities on their holders, the QNI provides a comprehensive ranking of the intrinsic quality of each citizenship status in the world. Both the internal value (economic opportunities, human development and peace and stability) and the external value (including the number and quality of visa-free travel and, crucially, settlement destinations) of all the nationalities in the world are measured, only to reveal the reality that the quality of nationalities is not correlated with the prestige of the issuing states.
Beautifully produced, richly illustrated and accompanied by insightful expert commentary, the QNI is the seminal reference for the citizenship aficionados. It is also an invaluable tool to illustrate the huge discrepancies in the value of the nationalities of the world: showcasing first-hand the unequal distribution of rights and opportunities which different nationalities bring to their holders.

The full QNI dataset on which this work is based is available in open access on Mendeley.

Table Of Contents

What is the QNI? The Creators' Preface
Ranking Nationalities, Not States
How Does It Work? The QNI in a Nutshell
The Creators, Editors, and Authors of the QNI
List of Contributors

Part 1 Laying Down the Base
By Dimitry Kochenov and Justin Lindeboom
1 The QNI's Task: Demystifying Citizenship through Clear Data
2 What Is Citizenship or Nationality?
3 Who Decides Who Is a National?
4 How to Decide Who Is a National
5 Nationalities Are Not Equal
6 A Country's Power and Citizenship Quality: The Lack of Correlation
7 Each Nationality Is Global: The Rise of Intercitizenships

Part 2 Methodology
8 Deploying a Clear Methodology to Tell a New Citizenship Story
9 Nationalities Included in the QNI
'Non-Citizens' of Latvia
Israeli Laissez-Passer
British Nationalities
Citizenship of the European Union
Territories That Do Not Possess a Separate Nationality
Statuses and Documents Excluded from the QNI for Failing to Meet the Criteria of a Nationality
10 Time of Measurement

Contents
11 Composition of the QNI
Human Development
Economic Strength
Peace and Stability
Diversity of Settlement Freedom
Weight of Settlement Freedom
Diversity of Travel Freedom
Weight of Travel Freedom

Part 3 The QNI General Ranking
12 Introduction to the QNI General Ranking
QNI General Ranking
Quality Tiers
13 Nationalities of the World in 2018
14 QNI General Ranking 2018
15 Movement between Tiers in 2014–2018
16 Risers in 2014–2018
Croatia
Romania
Bulgaria
United Arab Emirates
Colombia
Grenada
Peru
Timor-Leste
Georgia
Moldova
17 Fallers in 2014–2018
Yemen
Libya
Syrian Arab Republic
Qatar

Part 4 Regional and Thematic Rankings
18 Europe
19 Americas
20 Middle East and North Africa
21 Sub-Saharan Africa
22 Asia and the Pacific
23 European Union
24 Mercado Común del Sur
25 Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States
26 Gulf Cooperation Council
27 Economic Community of West African States
28 North Atlantic Treaty Organization
29 Eurasian Economic Union
30 Association of Southeast Asian Nations
31 Commonwealth of Nations
32 Largest Countries by Area
33 Microstates
34 Best Countries According to Perception
35 Most Powerful Countries According to Perception
36 Non-Recognized States

Part 5 Expert Commentary
37 North versus South or Integrated versus Isolated? Notes on the Global Grouping of Nationalities
By Yossi Harpaz
38 Population Density, Wealth, and Refugee Flows: New Perspectives of the Quality of Nationality Index
By Benjamin Hennig and Dimitris Ballas
39 The Quality of Statelessness
By Katja Swider
40 Citizenship-by-Investment (Ius Doni)
By Christian H. Kälin
41 Twenty-Four Shades of Sovereignty and Nationalities in the Pacific Region
By Gerard Prinsen
42 Passports, Free Movement, and the State in South America
By Diego Acosta Arcarazo
43 The Quality of African Nationalities
By Andreas Krensel
44 Two Sticks, Half a Carrot: External and Domestic Divisions in the Post-Soviet Space
By Ryhor Nizhnikau
45 Post-Yugoslav Nationalities
By Elena Basheska
46 Citizenship of the European Union and Brexit
By Dimitry Kochenov
47 Canadian Nationality: The Value of Belonging
By Jacquelyn D. Veraldi
48 Mexican Nationality
By Pablo Mateos
49 French Nationality
By Sébastien Platon
50 Nationality of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
By Jeremy Bierbach
51 Bulgarian Nationality: Dire Straits?
By Kamen Shoilev
52 'Non-Citizens' of Latvia
By Aleksejs Dimitrovs
53 Georgian Nationality
By Laure Delcour
54 Israel: Citizenship, Residence, Taxation: A View from Practice
By Eli Gervits
55 China and India
By Suryapratim Roy
56 Myanmar: The Unflinching Law of the Ethnic Citizen and the 'Mixed Blood' Other
By José-María Arraiza

Part 6 End Matter
Endnotes
Bibliography
Methodological Annex
Glossary of Terms
Alphabetical Index of Nationality Quality Charts Included in the Text
Acknowledgments

Reviews

“Many of us enjoy a ranking ... as I delved I felt there was a little more to it.” –  Michael Skapinker, The Financial Times

“The index they created measures each country on the rights its citizens have, such as the ability to settle freely in other countries with the passport they hold.” –  Alex Ledsom, Forbes

“A new ranking of every country's citizenship” –  The Economist

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